Tag Archives: art

The surreal and disturbing sculptures by Yui Ishibari

 

Yui Ishibari is a japanese artist who works with paintings and sculptures, but her main focus is her sculptures. Ishibari creates disturbing and bizarre art pieces, portraying children taken by plants, in a grotesque fusion of body, leaves, branches and roots. Ishibari’s sculptures are made from a wide range of materials, from resin, steel wires, cloth, stone powder cray and wood. The final pieces are surreal figures, hopeless against the forces of nature, figures who accepted their cruel destiny, a metaphor for nature’s power over the man.
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The weird and wonderful world of Walter Potter

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In addition to preserving and posing each creature he used, Potter also painstakingly crafted each little implement and prop from old wooden cigar boxes, and placed them against painted back drops often reminiscent of the local area.

Although originally made for his own amusement, his macabre scenes quickly grew in popularity and he was encouraged to open his own museum in 1861, in the summer-house of the pub his family owned. His collection of anthropomorphic taxidermy grew over the years, supplemented by examples of physically deformed animals that he collected from local farmers.

Eventually his curious menagerie expanded into a full museum known as “Mr Potter’s Museum of Curiosities”, a must-see attraction which turned the village of Bramber into a thriving tourist destination for many years. When Walter Potter died in 1918 the museum supposedly contained 10,000 specimens, but the fashion for such morbid curiosities had already begun to wane. Remarkably, however, the museum didn’t close until the 1970s, when it was sold by his heirs and moved to various locations in Britain until it ended up at the Jamaica Inn in Cornwall. There it stayed until 2003, when the contents were auctioned off to individual collectors around the world, sadly separating the strange collection for good. Damien Hirst, himself a dabbler in the dark arts of taxidermy, notoriously offered £1 million to keep Potter’s collection together at the time, but his bid was apparently rejected by the auction house.

Despite the scattering of his collection, interest in Walter Potter and his remarkable anthropomorphic dioramas has certainly not faded. The internet has helped govern a revival in interest in curious collections and sensibilities by exposing new audiences to these sorts of obscure artifacts and hidden histories. The internet also enables individuals to view many of Potter’s creations in one place, helping it to retain some semblance of a cohesive collection. Most recently, a significant number of Potter’s works were even reunited from private collections in an exhibition curated by Sir Peter Blake at the Museum of Everything in London in 2010.

Pat Morris, a scholar on the history of taxidermy, has observed that Potter’s taxidermy has now become an internationally famous icon of Victorian whimsy. This, I think, is a key reason why Potter’s collections have inspired such a renewed sense of curiosity in recent years. Although his created world where kittens play croquet and squirrels drink port is indeed a bizarre sight, to contemporary eyes the truly curious thing about it is that this was once an acceptable form of museum display, a respectable pastime, and a delightful tourist destination. In an age of the slick, white-walled, politically-correct, ethically-meticulous, compulsively-edifying modern museum, it is the anachronistic sensibility of the bizarre dioramas that is so compelling to a contemporary audience.

Astonishing Animal Sculptures By Afke Golsteijn and Floris Bakker

The artistic partnership of Afke Golsteijn and Floris Bakker, who collectively are better known as Idiots, present us with a unique body of work, characterized by the use of animal material exquisitely sculpted into natural positions and combined seamlessly with rich materials such as embroidery and pearls.
A contemporary touch is given to the classical memento mori concept, questioning the world’s current trend in over glorification through marketing. In a constantly twisting play between fantasy and reality, Idiots tell us about important themes such as life, death, beauty and restriction.
The striking beauty and the vividness of the animals that figure in the works, conjure powerful emotions of awe and inspiration before giving way to our morbid curiosity surrounding death, which leads us ultimately to think of our own mortality. This contrast between beauty, luxury and greed coupled with the mystery of death, timelessly preserved, transports one into a transient state of mind, in which anything is possible.(via: idiots.nl)
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Milan Nenezic

 

– “Nenezic’s work could never be described as shy and retiring. It’s brutal and confrontational, tackling anorexia, illness, death, regrettable sex and even acne with unflinching clarity; warts and all, with actual warts. Nenezic has created bold work across the board, using collage [link ], video [link ] and a collaborative performance piece with artist Katarina Petrovic, God Gives you Pleasure [link ], where they created a suit with four built in vibrators and a dildo, each touch activated by making the ‘spectacles, testicles, wallet and watch’ sign of the cross.
So it’s fair to say his work is challenging. However in an artistic climate where displaying crucifixes in vats of piss (Andres Serrano) and art projects allegedly involving repeated induced miscarriages (Aliza Shvarts) raise more yawns than eyebrows; rubbing religion up against sex is par for the course. What sets Nenezic aside from the ‘I’m an art student and I’m sewing a chicken fillet to my breast in protest of tampons’ crowd; is the fact that he has a breathtaking talent, a deft hand and a keen eye for imagery. Nenezic’s paintings use eye-watering detail and competent classical form to bring beauty to the most gruesome of subjects, reflecting an imploding society back to itself.
Nenezic’s themes, such as one night stands (the stunning ‘The Moment After’ series) and extreme body modification (the ‘I’m so Beautiful’ series), ensures his work captivates a modern audience, whilst his use of colour and light is reminiscent of Ingres’ bather, with the angular distorted bodies channelling Egon Schiele’s self portrait and the various secretions of Francis Bacon’s fleshier works.
It may not be pretty or tasteful, but Nenezic’s work entices discussion and incites a visceral reaction, whether it’s a postwar commentary on the psychological state of an unstable New Europe, or a glimpse into the rotten core of humanity; it’s more than can be said for a slew of artists who use shock without value.”

Words by Kate Weir
From “EyeSeeSound” Magazine http://www.eyeseesound.tv/edition/003.html

Zombie Burlesque Art

Since I am organising the Cork city zombie walk at the moment I said that I would add a bit more zombie to my anatomical posts! “Zombie Burlesque” is what happens when self-taught French artist, Angel Roy, decided to combine vintage pinup girl photography with the inexplicable Zombie craze sweeping the nation right now.In a collaboration with Glamorama Studio Photography’s own Mila the two produced a digital art series that is part anatomy, part glamor and definitely part macabre.In a side-by-side display of the original photo alongside the completed digital works of art, the viewer has a broader appreciation of the ‘before and after’ effect.

Using photography as a starting point, Roy uses graphic design as a way of giving more form to the pieces while reinterpreting what he calls ‘the classic codes of the portrait and landscape.’ Roy says, “In my collages graphics, anatomy disrupts the smooth image of the photographed body. I consider the human being, not as individuals but as a machine in motion, and I like to put forward his vital organs, its mechanisms, its branches, its brands, its traces. On this same method of composition (binder photo to graphics) I work the landscape, including that offered by larger cities. I change the architecture, space as I change the human being. The graphics in this case allows me to place the image in a particular context (historical, social, or cultural) or to give a totally imaginary.”