Tag Archives: miss memento mori

The surreal and disturbing sculptures by Yui Ishibari

 

Yui Ishibari is a japanese artist who works with paintings and sculptures, but her main focus is her sculptures. Ishibari creates disturbing and bizarre art pieces, portraying children taken by plants, in a grotesque fusion of body, leaves, branches and roots. Ishibari’s sculptures are made from a wide range of materials, from resin, steel wires, cloth, stone powder cray and wood. The final pieces are surreal figures, hopeless against the forces of nature, figures who accepted their cruel destiny, a metaphor for nature’s power over the man.
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The dark, gothic and surreal paintings by Yaroslav Gerzhedovich

 

 

Russian artist Yaroslav Gerzhedovich mixes photography, digital post-production (photoshop) and paintwork to create his fantastic and dark art pieces. In this post, let’s focus on his paintings.

It doesn’t matter if they are photo-based or painting-based. Gerzhedovich’s illustrations are dark and gothic. They seem extracted from dark corners of the worst nightmares, where there is barely a thin light, where invisible eyes are constantly and secretly watching you, where gods or other ancient beigns play carelessly with the life of mortals, generally driving them crazy.

Appreciate ahe dark, gothic and surreal paintings by Yaroslav Gerzhedovich:

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Surreal Watercolor Paintings of Anatomical Self-Dissections


In the photo-realistic series Anatomical Self-Dissections, artist Danny Quirk depicts several subjects performing dissections on their own bodies. The fine art illustrator takes a surreal approach to visualizing human anatomy by presenting portraiture’s in which the subjects tear and slice themselves open to unveil the inner workings of various sections of the human body, revealing their muscles, tissue, bones, and organs.

“My anatomical works combine classic poses, in dramatic chiaroscuro lighting, with a very contemporary twist… illustrating what’s underneath the skin, and the portrayed figure dissects a region of their body to show the structures that lay beneath,” says Quirk. “My work is perceivably on the darker side, but the [actuality] is, it’s about exploration.”

The surreal watercolor paintings are part of the aspiring medical illustrator’s growing portfolio of work as he heads into graduate school to pursue his dream job. The life-like renditions start as mere photographs, transform with some expert photo manipulation, and evolve into paintings all at the masterful hand of Quirk. Each painting alone takes anywhere from 20 to 30 hours to complete.

Markus Akesson

‘Markus Akesson‘s paintings deals with this; the interspaces between ideal and reality. A time related, spatial and psychological intermediate position where expectations and experience do not always join up. The paintings can be characterized by a compact stillness.And also something else. As a creation where one clearly understands that something has happened, and that something soon will happen. But we cannot see what it is. We are in the interval, the space in between. His works are also characterized by an almost fetishist attitude towards patterns, texture and surface, whether it’s a shoe, an oriental rug or the feathers of a vulture. A strong force that is catching and brings the spectator into the scenes.’ Words by: Milou Allerholm is a freelance art critic and Senior lecturer in Art History at the Royal University College of Fine Arts in Stockholm.

Milan Nenezic

 

– “Nenezic’s work could never be described as shy and retiring. It’s brutal and confrontational, tackling anorexia, illness, death, regrettable sex and even acne with unflinching clarity; warts and all, with actual warts. Nenezic has created bold work across the board, using collage [link ], video [link ] and a collaborative performance piece with artist Katarina Petrovic, God Gives you Pleasure [link ], where they created a suit with four built in vibrators and a dildo, each touch activated by making the ‘spectacles, testicles, wallet and watch’ sign of the cross.
So it’s fair to say his work is challenging. However in an artistic climate where displaying crucifixes in vats of piss (Andres Serrano) and art projects allegedly involving repeated induced miscarriages (Aliza Shvarts) raise more yawns than eyebrows; rubbing religion up against sex is par for the course. What sets Nenezic aside from the ‘I’m an art student and I’m sewing a chicken fillet to my breast in protest of tampons’ crowd; is the fact that he has a breathtaking talent, a deft hand and a keen eye for imagery. Nenezic’s paintings use eye-watering detail and competent classical form to bring beauty to the most gruesome of subjects, reflecting an imploding society back to itself.
Nenezic’s themes, such as one night stands (the stunning ‘The Moment After’ series) and extreme body modification (the ‘I’m so Beautiful’ series), ensures his work captivates a modern audience, whilst his use of colour and light is reminiscent of Ingres’ bather, with the angular distorted bodies channelling Egon Schiele’s self portrait and the various secretions of Francis Bacon’s fleshier works.
It may not be pretty or tasteful, but Nenezic’s work entices discussion and incites a visceral reaction, whether it’s a postwar commentary on the psychological state of an unstable New Europe, or a glimpse into the rotten core of humanity; it’s more than can be said for a slew of artists who use shock without value.”

Words by Kate Weir
From “EyeSeeSound” Magazine http://www.eyeseesound.tv/edition/003.html