Tag Archives: mortality

The surreal and disturbing sculptures by Yui Ishibari

 

Yui Ishibari is a japanese artist who works with paintings and sculptures, but her main focus is her sculptures. Ishibari creates disturbing and bizarre art pieces, portraying children taken by plants, in a grotesque fusion of body, leaves, branches and roots. Ishibari’s sculptures are made from a wide range of materials, from resin, steel wires, cloth, stone powder cray and wood. The final pieces are surreal figures, hopeless against the forces of nature, figures who accepted their cruel destiny, a metaphor for nature’s power over the man.
a-tree-scu9-3-b a-tree-tenji2011 calling-scu10-1-b calling-scu10-2-b end-of-tears-scu5-3-b end-of-tears-scu5-4-b mari-scu11-1 mari-scu11-2 mari-scu11-3 mari-scu11-4 then-it-returns-slowly-scu6-1-b then-it-returns-slowly-scu6-3-b YuiSculpture2

Alex Randall

130412164132-taxidermy-comanche-horizontal-gallery alex-randall-2 alex-randall-3 alex-randall-5 large-antler-whiteback1-thumb-1240x1770-23563 pigeons1 randall2-thumb-645x663-23571 randall3-thumb-645x663-23573 randall4-thumb-1240x1858-23572 signature“Perhaps a subtle reference to the prominence of rodents in London (supposedly you’re never further than three feet from the creatures), the Rat Swarm lamp is a thing of dark pleasure. The On a Thread chandelier (pictured here, with its dangling, rusty saw blades, continues the macabre theme. Made from a couple of wooden legs—the light shines out from within its hollows— Patience, like all Randall’s work, dislocates her subject matter context.

Where past seasons have seen many designers referencing the antler as a motif, most choose to beautify the object—removing the Antler from the action of death. Unsurprisingly, Randall moves the opposite way, hanging hers from a series of meaty hooks for an effect that’s still beautiful but more sympathetic to the lineage of item.”  taken from Richard prime-  via coolhunting.com 🙂

Surreal Watercolor Paintings of Anatomical Self-Dissections


In the photo-realistic series Anatomical Self-Dissections, artist Danny Quirk depicts several subjects performing dissections on their own bodies. The fine art illustrator takes a surreal approach to visualizing human anatomy by presenting portraiture’s in which the subjects tear and slice themselves open to unveil the inner workings of various sections of the human body, revealing their muscles, tissue, bones, and organs.

“My anatomical works combine classic poses, in dramatic chiaroscuro lighting, with a very contemporary twist… illustrating what’s underneath the skin, and the portrayed figure dissects a region of their body to show the structures that lay beneath,” says Quirk. “My work is perceivably on the darker side, but the [actuality] is, it’s about exploration.”

The surreal watercolor paintings are part of the aspiring medical illustrator’s growing portfolio of work as he heads into graduate school to pursue his dream job. The life-like renditions start as mere photographs, transform with some expert photo manipulation, and evolve into paintings all at the masterful hand of Quirk. Each painting alone takes anywhere from 20 to 30 hours to complete.

Milan Nenezic

 

– “Nenezic’s work could never be described as shy and retiring. It’s brutal and confrontational, tackling anorexia, illness, death, regrettable sex and even acne with unflinching clarity; warts and all, with actual warts. Nenezic has created bold work across the board, using collage [link ], video [link ] and a collaborative performance piece with artist Katarina Petrovic, God Gives you Pleasure [link ], where they created a suit with four built in vibrators and a dildo, each touch activated by making the ‘spectacles, testicles, wallet and watch’ sign of the cross.
So it’s fair to say his work is challenging. However in an artistic climate where displaying crucifixes in vats of piss (Andres Serrano) and art projects allegedly involving repeated induced miscarriages (Aliza Shvarts) raise more yawns than eyebrows; rubbing religion up against sex is par for the course. What sets Nenezic aside from the ‘I’m an art student and I’m sewing a chicken fillet to my breast in protest of tampons’ crowd; is the fact that he has a breathtaking talent, a deft hand and a keen eye for imagery. Nenezic’s paintings use eye-watering detail and competent classical form to bring beauty to the most gruesome of subjects, reflecting an imploding society back to itself.
Nenezic’s themes, such as one night stands (the stunning ‘The Moment After’ series) and extreme body modification (the ‘I’m so Beautiful’ series), ensures his work captivates a modern audience, whilst his use of colour and light is reminiscent of Ingres’ bather, with the angular distorted bodies channelling Egon Schiele’s self portrait and the various secretions of Francis Bacon’s fleshier works.
It may not be pretty or tasteful, but Nenezic’s work entices discussion and incites a visceral reaction, whether it’s a postwar commentary on the psychological state of an unstable New Europe, or a glimpse into the rotten core of humanity; it’s more than can be said for a slew of artists who use shock without value.”

Words by Kate Weir
From “EyeSeeSound” Magazine http://www.eyeseesound.tv/edition/003.html

St. Dennistoun Mortuary Coin-Operated Automaton

St. Dennistoun Mortuary Automaton

I love antique automation, visited a automation museum in spain with mikey a few years ago but saw nothing as cool as this! 🙂

Lot 207
“St. Dennistoun Mortuary” Coin-Operated Automaton, attributed to Leonard Lee, c. 1900, the mahogany cabinet and glazed viewing area displays a Greek Revival mortuary building with double doors and grieving mourners out front, when a coin is inserted, doors open and the room is lighted revealing four morticians and four poor souls on embalming tables, the morticians move as if busily at work on their grisly task and mourners standing outside bob their heads as if sobbing in grief, ht. 30 1/2, wd. 24, dp. 17 1/4 in.